Spring Camp Registration 2017

Spring Camp Registration
Journey Under the Sea
April 10th, 2016 - April 14th, 2017
8:00 am - 5:30 pm

Registration will be done on a first come, first serve basis. Spaces are limited and fill quickly! Registration will end on Friday, March 31st unless unless the available spaces fill.
Registration Form must returned with payment in order to secure your student's space.
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Part-Time School Custodian and Maintenance

Description: Employer will do a background check. Position entails cleaning restrooms, classrooms, and hallways, emptying trash, sweeping & mopping floors. Heavier cleaning; Waxing and buffing, carpet cleaning, disinfecting, and other deep cleaning will be performed weekly.

Tools and supplies will be provided. Applicants must be able to lift a minimum of 50 lbs. Candidate must be able to communicate and work well with other janitorial and facilities staff. The school has a Facilities team plus Janitorial team and depending on the candidate's qualifications and performance, possibilities for upward mobility within the company may be available.

Prerequisites: Must pass a full background check; Be dependable, honest and trustworthy. Attendance is extremely important and candidate should have reliable transportation in all weather conditions, all seasons of the year.

Hours: 15-20 Hours Per Week, Every Weeknight after 6pm and Saturday for deep cleaning. Training hours may require more flexibility. Hours may be adjustable after a period of time on the job.

Location:
Montessori Community School
2416 East 1700 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84108

Language: Bilingual (English / Spanish) Preferred

Salary : $10-$12 DOE
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Featured

The Power of your Child's Birth Story

Have you ever told your child the riveting and powerful story of their entrance into this great life? This is one of my favorite aspects of parenthood. Instilling wonder and thoughtfulness about your child’s emergence to earth is truly awe inspiring for them. Hearing the story of their own birth can calm a child’s fears, can build a child who feels down or sad and can bring great joy to any child. Understanding not only the emergence itself, but the powerful emotions tied to their anticipated arrival and their delivery give a child perspective into their powers as a human. Understanding their place in a family, their most important community of all, is hugely rewarding for a child. Children deeply appreciate learning how their own birth made a marked difference in the history of the universe. 




A child will love this story at any point in their life, but the most crucial and powerful time to tell a child the story of their own birth is during the elementary years, particularly early elementary. The elementary child is finding their place in the world. Their understanding of its vastness has become more easy to comprehend and their curiosity about the interconnectedness of all living things is undeniably enthusiastic. Relationships can become deep and meaningful, particularly those outside the family. Children’s search for what matters, their social sensitivities and their developing moral judgement at this stage of development can often lead to questions like “Who am I...how do I fit in?” These are important questions and for this reason their personal birth story can be relevant pieces of the puzzle they are working on personally.

In a Montessori Lower Elementary program, the study of timelines show evolution of plants, animals, and humans. We work to instill a love and respect for our earth. A child’s place in this evolution helps them relate to their family, their social circle, and reinforces that all living things are valuable. Not to mention, humans develop a core belief about themselves at a very early age.  What could possibly make a person believe they matter, that they have the power to change the world, or the power of love more than hearing about the love that enters a parent's
heart when they meet their child for the first time? 



How was your child thought of while in utero?

What kind of preparations did you make for your child to join your family?

What kind of dreams did you have for your child and your family?

What was your child’s anticipated arrival like?

What were the feelings you had when your child’s delivery began?

What are the details about your child’s birth?

How did you spend the first moments/hours/days of your child’s life?


My own three children could recite the stories of their births themselves, and still, they ask to hear it often. We share those memories in times of sadness, in times of fear, in times of joy, in times of laughter. Every detail holds deep meaning for each of us and the parts that speak to us change as we change and evolve as individuals and as a family.
Bedtime stories have never been so much fun. 

Happy story telling! 




My beautiful family. My sister introduces her son to his new baby brother for the first time.
The magic of families is endless. 











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Early Childhood Teaching Position



Montessori Community School
Early Childhood Teacher

Montessori Community School of Salt Lake City seeks a full time certified and experienced Early Childhood Teacher to co-teach in a classroom of approximately 25 children ages 3 to 6 years.  MCS has 4 Early Childhood classrooms and the teachers in the program will work closely together to plan and implement curriculum.  

We seek a warm, imaginative, bright, flexible, and creative teacher who can effectively plan, problem solve and collaborate with a team of Early Childhood teachers.  The ability to understand and willingness to work with a range of learning styles is required.  We expect our staff to be involved and active in our school community; participating in the ongoing development and refinement of our school’s curriculum, policy and procedures. Confidence, professionalism, and a sense of humor are important characteristics.  Candidates must be able to communicate effectively with parents, students and staff. A strong respect for and love of children centered in an understanding of the Montessori philosophy are essential.  We look for a long-term commitment to MCS. Candidates must be CPR and First Aid Certified or be able to obtain CPR and First Aid Certification within 30 days of hire. All candidates will have a background check and be required to have a TB test.

...
More Info
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The Value of the Three Year Cycle - A Parent's Perspective

The Capstone Year

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the third year of the Early Childhood three year cycle. We made the decision to keep our oldest daughter in the Magnolias Class to complete the cycle (known as the Capstone Year).

Last year, an article in The Atlantic called “The New Preschool is Crushing Kids” (read here) helped support our decision. In the mainstream setting, Kindergarten has become the new first grade, and Common Core standards have laid out academic guidelines for what should be completed in Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten. Research corroborates that kindergarteners spend more time doing seat work and less time doing art and music.  The net result is 2nd graders who perform worse on tests measuring literacy, language, and math skills. The cause, it is thought, is direct instruction that is repetitive and uninspired which leads to children losing their enthusiasm for learning.




How do we maintain that joy for learning and school that can inspire ongoing discovery? The Montessori curriculum inspires life-long inquiry with a heavy emphasis on social interaction, outdoor experiences, art and music. Communication and dynamic interactions with peers and teachers allow children to be self-reflective critical thinkers.

The groundwork for reading and literacy is language, and the Montessori classroom capitalizes on our children’s sensitive period for language.  Imagine my surprise when my four year old came home recently asking to read a book to me. I indulged her request knowing that she has not quite mastered all the letter sounds, and yet she comfortably read the book.  “Where did you learn to read?” I asked.  “I just know.” she said.  The Montessori curriculum has laid the groundwork so that our children can put it all together in their own time. We only need to give them the freedom and opportunity to do so.

This is exactly why the capstone year is so important. Our children become leaders in the classroom during the third year. They consolidate all the learning that has taken place in the first two years of the cycle. They grow confidence, they enjoy themselves, and they learn new things in a low pressure environment in which they feel very comfortable.

I loved seeing my oldest daughter thrive in her third year. You could see an extra bounce in her step and she loved going to school each day. Her reading and math skills blossomed and her social skills became more nuanced. In short, she thrived.

I was also a little nervous that she would enter her new school behind the other kids who had been in the academic “seat-work” environment for two years already… and I’ll admit that in the first quarter, her reading wasn’t as fluent as some of the other children’s and her performance on timed math assessments was lacking a bit of luster. (Then again, if you know her, you know that anything timed is not of interest to her!)  Interestingly, as the year has progressed, she’s blossomed. It’s as if you can see the cumulative effect of the critical thinking skills and self-directed learning all come together. She’s asking questions about the relationships between different concepts and she’s reading books that really interest her.  I’m not sure she’ll love the timed math tests, but as she says, “that’s just my way”.  The credit for her progress goes to the Montessori Capstone Year.

I’m so glad that we’ve been able to give her the gift of an extra year of play, joy, and mastery. The data and our family’s personal experience support what Maria Montessori knew long ago… The third year of the cycle is a crucial element of the Montessori Early Childhood education.  

You are welcome to contact me if you want to discuss the third year in further detail!

Vicki Wilkins - MCS Toddler and Early Childhood parent

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Featured

All School Assembly - Utah Okinawa Kenjinkai Cultural Experience

Our Second Annual All-school Assembly took place Wednesday morning at MCS! All of our staff and students, from toddlers to elementary, gathered for an incredible presentation. The Utah Okinawa Kenjinkai group shared a beautiful performance about their cultural Japanese heritage. They introduced us to Okinawan traditional music, dances, folk craft, and martial arts while briefly discussing the Japanese history associated in a fun and enlightening way.




A lot of our young toddler friends enjoyed singing and dancing throughout the assembly while our older friends were impressed by the costumes and instruments. In the traditional Okinawan dance, the Eisa, there is a closing song to end the performance. We were invited to join the dancers and dance together waving our hands to the beat of the music and drums. It was a great experience for all of our students to enjoy this cultural opportunity as a whole community.




Check our last year's experience here.



By Paola Ramirez


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Featured

The Gift of Adult Learning

Today I was graced with the most lovely opportunity to observe a teacher intern in one of our classrooms.  MCS has the ongoing opportunity to support and host adult interns seeking Montessori certification at all levels.  The process of a teacher receiving Montessori training is as well developed a system as the Montessori method itself.  Following an intense period of study of Montessori theory, history, methodology, didactic training and classroom management, an intern spends 1-2 years engaged in a teaching practicum (internship).  During this initial experience as a teacher, with a wealth of newfound understanding and insight to the child and its environment, the teacher goes through the magical process of implementation under the direction of a master teacher. 

Maria Montessori said "The teacher, when she begins to work in our schools, must have a kind of faith that the child will reveal himself through the work. She must free herself from all preconceived ideas concerning the levels at which the children may be." 

The process of having absolute faith in our little ones to develop in their own time, in their own way, and to their most authentic selves takes absolute faith.  We let go of our own egos to allow for the child's great awakening. I will never forget my own hours of study...learning precisely how each material is to be presented, memorizing the sequence and curriculum, identifying sensitive periods in the children, writing lesson plans only to be erased and re-written, and discovering the meaning behind "preparation of the environment".  Those hours paled in comparison to the spiritual awakening and rebirth of self that I am honored to experience on a daily basis at MCS.

And so today I applaud all those who have themselves engaged in this transformation process.  Hosting interns means that MCS is a place for adult learning, teacher collaboration and exposure to ongoing research. Additional kudos to those master teachers who commit themselves to the process of guiding these new interns; an ongoing process of renewal and one of the beautiful experiences that brings MCS together as community. 


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Featured

Winter Sports: A Group Experience



The intent behind our Winter Sports Program is that these lessons and experiences let our students have a real-life group driven experience where there is crossover between programs; where there are great opportunities for the students to practice the life skills they have been learning and practicing in such a safe environment here at MCS. It is an opportunity to let our students explore one of Utah's greatest beauties- the mountains and our incredible snow.



Please keep in mind that these lessons are peer-oriented and group options are bound to contain a number of skill sets being presented, developed, and learned amongst the students. Some students are at the peak of that skill set and some are at the base of that skill set. However, those students are all within the same level. It can become very frustrating when friends ski/ board together on the weekends, but are grouped apart for the lessons. However, we ask that you place your trust in the ski program to group our students as they see fit and ask that you remind your children to do the same.  



We really want to enforce that as these lessons continue on, it really is a collaboration as a group to learn and practice. Snowbird has hand-picked instructors specifically for our school, and instructors go through intense training on how to meet the needs of each student in the group.  

A successful day may not be or mean that your student was the fastest, moved up a group, etc. A successful day should be evaluated on whether or not your student was safe, having fun, in an environment where they can learn without frustration, were able to communicate their feelings appropriately, follow instructions, and engage appropriately with their chaperones, instructors, and peers. Ultimately, when a student is feeling comfortable and safe, there will be more detailed, controlled progress. One of the reasons we appreciate Snowbirds Ski Program is that they take an approach to individualized instruction that is similar to our approach here at MCS.  However, their ability to separate every single skill level is limited by a number of factors. 


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Featured

Early Childhood Performing Arts Showcases

Early Childhood's Music and Movement Classes Present their Performing Arts Showcase of:

The Napping House


Please have your students meet in the Dance Studio at
6:15 pm. Ensure your student is wearing their pajamas- but not some that might be slippery on a stage.




Sequoias and Magnolias will perform: Tuesday, February 21st


Willows and Aspens will perform: Tuesday, February 28th 


We hope to see you there as this is an event you won't want to miss out on.


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Featured

The Capstone Year...what every Montessori parent should know!

What is the Capstone Year and why does my child deserve to have one?

We often refer to the 3rd Year a child is in a Montessori program as the Capstone Year. But, what is it really that makes that year so special/important? While the reasons to leave can be compelling and are worth every consideration, we believe the reasons to stay are worth your careful and thoughtful consideration.

Below is a list of 24 reasons we recommend keeping your child in Montessori for the Capstone Year:

  1. Does your child look forward to attending school? If so, consider yourself lucky. Why tinker with a winning situation when so many other families are frustrated or disappointed with their child’s school experience.
  2. Your child has waited for two years to be a leaders in their class. The third year students are looked up to as role models for the younger students, and most children eagerly await their opportunity to play this role.
  3. The third year is the time when many of the earlier lessons come together and become a permanent part of the child’s understanding. An excellent example is the early introduction to addition with large numbers through the Bank Game. When children leave Montessori at age five, many of the still forming concepts evaporate, just as a child living overseas will learn to speak two languages, but may quickly lose the second language if his family moves back home.
  4. As a leader in the class, your child has many opportunities to teach the younger children lessons that he learned when he was their age. Research proves that this experience has powerful benefits for both tutor and tutoree.
  5. Third Year Montessori children normally go on to still more fascinating lessons and more advanced Montessori materials. The natural process of abstraction or critical thinking around familiar concepts materializes naturally and gears the child up for more advanced skills.
  6. The Montessori curriculum is more sophisticated than that found in traditional programs.
  7. Having spent two years together, your child’s teachers know her very, very well. They know her strengths and areas that are presenting challenges. She can begin the year strong, without having to build a relationship of trust with her teacher.
  8. Your child already knows most of her classmates. She has grown up in a safe, supportive classroom setting. She is learning appropriate social boundaries and interactions with a group of familiar peers.
  9.  If your child goes on to another school, he will spend the first half of the year just getting used to the new educational approach.
  10.  Montessori math is based on the European tradition of unified mathematics. Montessori introduces young children to basic geometry and other sophisticated concepts as early as kindergarten. Our spiraling curriculum means students will revisit these skills and build on them throughout their elementary experience.
  11.  Third Years have a real sense of running their classroom community, an important leadership skill that goes on with them.
  12.  In Montessori, your child can continue to progress at her own pace. In traditional education, she will have to wait while the other children begin to catch up or will be forced to move ahead before she is ready.
  13. Beginning as early as kindergarten and continuing through elementary, Montessori children are studying cultural geography and beginning to grow into global citizens.
  14.  In Montessori, students work with intriguing learning materials instead of preprinted work books, allowing a student to work on a skill for the right amount of time for their own understanding and not by a predetermined timeline.
  15.  Emphasis is given to the arts, movement, and outdoor education. Exploration and creativity in these areas are continuously accessible and are encouraged.
  16. In Montessori, your child has been treated with a deep respect as a unique individual. The school has been equally concerned for his intellectual, social, and emotional development.
  17. Montessori schools are warm and supportive communities of students, teachers, and parents. Children can’t easily slip through the cracks!
  18. Montessori consciously teaches children to be kind and peaceful.
  19. In Montessori schools, learning is not focused on rote drill and memorization. Our goal is to develop students who really understand their schoolwork.
  20. Montessori students learn through hands-on experience, investigation, and research. They become actively engaged in their studies, rather than passively waiting to be spoon-fed.
  21. Montessori is consciously designed to recognize and address different learning styles, helping students learn to study most effectively.
  22. Montessori challenges and set high expectations for all students not only a special few.
  23. Montessori students develop self-discipline and an internal sense of purpose and motivation.
  24. Three, six, nine and twelve years old are natural transitional ages for children. They are the best time for children to move to new classrooms or schools.
     Third Year Upper Elementary students sale handmade items at the Montessori Market,
a business that supports their end of year outdoor adventure. This year they'll raft on the Green River!        


             
This Third Year Upper Elementary student creates the square of 19
using a Montessori Math material, the Peg Board. 

     
  
    
Creativity at its finest!


If you still have any doubt, spend a morning observing in your child’s class and compare it with a class in the other school you are considering. Sit quietly and take mental notes. The differences may be subtle, but most likely they will be significant. Then project your child into the future and ask yourself how the positive differences you observed in the Montessori classroom might help shape your child to become the teenager, and later the adult, you envisioned for your child’s future.

(Adapted from Tim Seldin’s 25 Reasons to Keep Your Child in Montessori Through the Kindergarten Year, Tomorrow’s Child.)
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Potential Winter Sports Program Chaperones

Dear Potential Winter Sports Program Chaperones,

Please keep in mind, as we love to have your support and help during Winter Sports, we have found it is best if we can have consistency with our chaperones. The students do better seeing familiar faces. This helps the students have a greater sense of surrounding and comfort.

This will also help with consistent group support on the hillside and getting on and off the busses.

Please, only sign up if you are able to attend at least 4 out of the 5 weeks and note we need our hillside chaperones to be able to efficiently ski/board with the little one and help out with lift riding. We also need chaperones that are not skiing, but help out on the busses and with keeping track of and leading students to the correct places.

Thanks,

Admin
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Holiday Giving Gratitude



Dear Montessori Community School,

I want to say thank you on behalf of all of us here at Neighborhood House for your help with Giving Tree. You & everyone at Montessori PSA did so much to help make the holiday season bright for the children & families we serve. Attached is a thank you video & a few photos that you are welcome to share with your colleagues, friends, or family members who may have helped with Giving Tree gifts for kids in our programs. We look forward to partnering with you in the new year & so appreciate all you do to help make Neighborhood House & our community great!

 We hope you & everyone at Montessori PSA have a very happy New Year!

 All the best,

...
More Info
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MCS' Service Learning Helps with COEEF's Student Success

MCS sponsors six girls through the COEEF Program. Each year we raise money for them through our annual Fun Run in the spring. Stay tuned for more information about our Fun Run this coming season.
Please read this amazing clip from COEEF's January 2017 Newsletter:

STUDENTS’ SUCCESS

Great News! 

In the last nine years, 90 COEEF students have completed high school. Of these students. 83 (92.2%) joined different universities throughout Ethiopia.

Of the students who joined universities, seven of them have successfully completed their university education and started a career.

...
More Info
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Featured

Wild Utah at Montessori Community School

Students and teachers at MCS had a wild time at camp this past month! Our summer camps allow children to explore other countries and cultures, so we decided to use this year’s winter camp as an opportunity to learn more about our local environment here on the Wasatch Front. Accompanied by real-life materials from mammals big and small, we learned about some of the animals which also call Utah home.


We started our journey with American black bears, letting our friends handle a black bear’s pelt, skull, and rubber footprints. The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources lent us front and hind prints of a black bear and, for size comparison, they also lent us a print made from the Alaskan Kodiak bear, Bart (who used to live in Heber, Utah with his trainers). The children were very excited to see the size difference between black bear prints and a Kodiak bear print. After learning more about bears and hibernation, friends made their very own bear den craft with a sleeping bear inside.


Each day, we had a new set of animals to observe and study. We learned about migratory animals like elk, moose, mule deer and pronghorns. We handled antler sheds and talked about the differences between antlers and horns. Friends were especially excited to meet our bobcat and mountain lion pelts and to see the differences in size, color, and the texture of their fur. They made their own animal prints out of clay and we discussed how, unlike coyotes and foxes, Utah’s cats have retractable claws.


On the last day of camp, we learned about our high climbing animals, mountain goats and bighorn sheep. We were able to handle the skull of a male bighorn sheep and to handle the horns of both male and female sheep. We observed the horns and noted that they show growth rings for each year the sheep is alive. Friends made bighorn headbands of their own and spontaneously decided to put on a mountain goat puppet show.




With all of our materials from the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, as well as some very kind MCS families, we were able to set up a mini-museum on the stage with a range of pelts, skulls, horns, sheds, and prints of Utah’s animals. Lower elementary students, Elyse and Anish, helped to organize the display and label our materials so that returning students could enjoy a piece of our Wild Utah winter camp.


...
More Info
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Featured

What Makes MCS Unique?


Montessori Community School offers an authentic Montessori education while supporting a charming and safe community for our students and their families. Choosing the right school can be a difficult task as increasing numbers in research show the impact of early education on the growing brain. So, beyond why a parent might choose a Montessori education for their child, I would like to answer some common questions about what sets Montessori Community School apart and how you will know if it is the right fit for your family.
  • Tour, Admissions Meetings and Observation: Inquiring parents are required to visit our facility prior to acceptance of their child. This allows parents to “get a feel” for our campus and to learn specifics about each program from a knowledgeable member of our staff. Following attendance at a tour or an admissions meeting, parents are invited to observe in one of our classrooms. While an observation is not required, our goal is to help parents have a clear understanding of and comfort in the design of our programs before their child attends classes. 
  • Focus on the whole child and their developmental needs: Montessori Community School offers an authentic Montessori education where equal attention is given to a child’s academic, social, and emotional needs. Along with learning at their own academic pace, children are given opportunities to learn self regulation and time management, develop and exercise independence and are given many opportunities to practice and refine social graces. Be it math or conflict resolution, lessons are given as needed, allowing children to progress at their own rate and ensuring success of one skill before moving on to the next. 
  • Mistakes are the best way to learn: We live in a time where safety concerns have made it difficult to give our children space to make mistakes. Montessori Community School is a safe place for children to explore, practice, and learn from their mistakes. Our staff is committed to helping students work through challenges in a safe and controlled environment, preparing them for the world outside of school. Self correcting materials allow children to identify mistakes within their academics and encourage children to try something until they feel confident enough to move on. 
  • Multi age classrooms: Angeline Stoll Lillard, in her authoritative research review Montessori: The Science Behind the Genius, describes the Montessori multi-age setting this way: "Montessori encourages learning from peers in part by using three-year age groupings. This ensures that as children move through the classroom they will be exposed to older and younger peers, facilitating both imitative learning and peer tutoring... Dr. Montessori was quite clear about the need for this mix of ages." These multi age groupings also allow teachers, students and parents to develop close relationships, making a team approach to education manageable and effective. 
  • Children get to choose and children get to move: Children like to make choices; they like to be the masters of themselves. In a safe and carefully prepared environment, MCS students are given the option to choose which area of the classroom to work in at any given time. The carefully prepared environment ensures that there are materials and activities to meet a variety of interest and skill level. They decide how much time or energy should be put into a particular task and children are encouraged to revisit materials or lessons as needed, are invited to move forward when they feel they are ready, and have the opportunity to actively research topics that interest them while giving adequate time and attention to the foundational skills needed in each academic area of the curriculum. Children in every program at MCS are able to move throughout the classroom, and sometimes beyond, to meet the very important need for movement in their growing bodies. Movement from work to lesson to snack and so forth ensures that children can stay engaged in their work process throughout the entire uninterrupted work cycles. Growing and changing bodies have many options for work spaces and styles. 
  • Community: MCS prides itself on having a close knit and caring community. You will find community in individual classrooms as students stay in one class for an entire cycle and because of the longevity of our teaching staff. MCS staff have been with us anywhere from 2 to 25 years. MCS parents are committed to supporting our students, our staff and our programs and a variety of organizations exist to allow parent involvement and support. A number of events encourage the community to come together on a regular basis. 
  • Variety in schedules: As part of our commitment to community and family, MCS offers a variety of scheduling options. Parents can be assured that their children are well cared for, well loved, and respected for their individuality and uniqueness without having to transfer to a different program part way through the parents work day.

Interested parents are invited to learn more about MCS at an upcoming Admissions Information Meeting on January 19, 2016 from 6:30-8pm. Adults only, sorry no child care provided for this event.

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Featured

2017 Admissions Information Meeting - New Students

2017 Admissions Information Meeting - New Students

Thursday, January 19th, 2017

Meeting starts promptly at 6:30pm
Adults only - sorry, no child care provided
Bring a friend!

Montessori Community School will be hosting an Admissions Information Meeting for all adults interested in learning more about any of our programs for 2017-2018 Admissions. Parents are invited to join us for a presentation about Montessori method, curriculum and philosophy and how they are implemented in our program to educate the whole child. Then, visit individual classrooms to learn more about each program and to meet and greet with our administrative and teaching staff. 
 
2017-2018 Application Packets will be available.

Montessori Community School serves children aged 18 months through 6th grade and we offer an extended day program, 7:30am - 6:00pm. Confirm your attendance or interest in coming on our Facebook event.

Montessori Community School's mission is to provide a rich, individualized educational experience, which guides and nurtures the natural unfolding of the whole individual and inspires a lifetime love of learning and peace.

   

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Featured

Winter Camp 2016 - Wild Utah

This year's Winter Camp theme is Wild Utah. The students will have amazing opportunities to learn about animals of Utah through a lot of fun activities including animal track and scat identification, creating animal tracks, handling real pelts and skulls, and, of course, a lot of arts and crafts.

A Few Reminders:
  • The doors do not open until 8:00 am and camp also closes at 5:30 pm. Please be mindful of these times. Plan to be at the school no later than 5:25 pm to ensure there are no late pick-ups. -Late Pick-Up Fees will apply.
  • Ensure your child brings the following items to camp:  winter attire, a lunch from home, and a change of clothes (for Toddler and Early Childhood students). If your child takes naps, please provide a blanket.  
  • Make sure that your child brings appropriate clothing for any weather, as we will go outside whenever the weather permits.
We look forward to providing a fun filled winter break for your students.If you have any questions about camp, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We look forward to providing a fun filled winter break for your students.


Click here for a camp schedule.
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Featured

How to Emotionally Prepare Your Student for a Future Event


There is a power in preparing for future events by devising solutions and strategies for goals rather than emphasizing, simply, avoiding problems. 

For example, having students identify what their best hopes are for their behavior during a field trip and asking them to identify those hopes in specific detail. If the student is unable to come up with their "best hope" we can ask them to think about what their teacher or parent would likely say if asked that question. 

If you have a particular student anticipated in having more trouble than another, you could meet with a parent and/or teacher so they can hear the opinion of that other person word for word.

The following is how our school plans to approach students in preparation for Winter Sports and we suggest parents take a similar approach as you start engaging in conversations about the Winter Sports Program and the ski/ snowboard lessons. 

Sample Situation 1:

Teacher/ Administration/ Parent:
Student, what are your best hopes for your behavior during winter sports (future event) this week?

Student: 
I will behave myself/ act good/ some other generic response.

Teacher/ Administration/ Parent:
So, if you were behaving yourself/ acting good (student's words) during winter sports (future event) this week, what would that look like? (student response) What would your ski instructor notice/see you doing? (student response)

[We are looking for specific behaviors here, with as much detail as possible. We also want these behaviors to be positively worded (so it's not an absence of some negative behavior, it's the presence of a positive behavior we are focusing on).]

Teacher/ Administration/ Parent:
So, let's say that you were able to meet your best hopes. You _________, __________, and ____________ (list positive behaviors they identified they will display). If you did all those things during winter sports this week, what difference would that make?

After each future event, you want to help the student reflect on what went well (so we can do more of what works).


Sample Situation 2:


Teacher/ Administration/ Parent:
Student, what are your best hopes for your behavior during winter sports (future event) this week?

Student: 
I don't know.

Teacher/ Administration/ Parent:
Ok, well, what do you think your teacher would say? What do they hope to see from you during winter sports?

[You are looking for a specific behavior here, with as much detail as possible. We also want these behaviors to be positively worded (so it's not an absence of some negative behavior, it's the presence of a positive behavior we are focusing on).]

Student:
Um, the want me to ski well.

Teacher/ Administration/ Parent:
Ok, so if you were skiing well, what would that look like? [Student gives a description of turning, skiing not too fast etc.]

And what else do you need to do in order to ski well? Are there other things that you should be doing in your lessons to help you ski your best? [Leading into positive behaviors such as listening, following instructions, controlling their body, etc.]

So, let's say that you were able to meet your best hopes. You ______________, ___________, and _______________ (list positive behaviors they identified they will display). If you did all those things during winter sports this week, what difference would that make?


After each future event we want to help the student reflect on what went well (so we can do more of what works). Help the student process the event. If an amends are in order consider having the student write an apology letter reflecting on the behavior,  and perhaps how that behavior made you and other feel. This will help the student connect their behavior to environmental facets (you, instructors, other students etc).

This information was advised by school psychologist, Dr. Melissa DeVries.
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Broadway Kids Studio Class


A new Broadway Kids Studio Class will be starting in January. Class will take place on Mondays for both Elementary and Early Childhood students.



Please see here for the Registration Forms and more information. Forms can also be found in the MCS lobby.
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Our Grandmothers We Sponsor

As many of you know, Montessori Community School sponsors two grandmothers through the Adopt-A-Native-Elder Program. This year, our 3rd Year Lower and 5th Year Upper Elementary students were able to attend the Navajo Rug Show at Deer Valley Resort in November. 
In November, we did a light food, clothing, and supply drive for our Elders. However, each year around the holidays, we are able to send more directly to our grandmothers, Elvira Horseherder, and Anita Jackson.

Funds raised during our annual Fun Run go directly toward our Service Learning objectives: Adopt-A-Native-Elder Program (our grandmothers) and our girls we sponsor through the Children of Ethiopia Education Fund, COEEF.

Due to the success of last year's Fun Run, this holiday season, we have been able to send our grandmothers much needed supplies such as wool for weaving, bundles of firewood ($500 each), Fall and Spring Gift Packs, and Food Gift Certificates coming to a total of $2,239.94.

In addition to these items, MCS also sends each of our grandmothers $300 gift cards to Walmart. Please see this letter from the Adopt-A-Native-Elder Program Head. We thank you all for your generosity and support in your student's education of service and your example and spirit of love you generate and pass along to the world. 
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