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Montessori Community School's PSA is playing off the school's green initiative and will be hosting a huge yard sale Saturday, June 13th beginning at 8:00 am and running through 12:00 pm. 

Proceeds from the sale will benefit a number of the school's special projects. For example, completing the fence around the Outdoor Classroom, funding a portion of the much needed school roof, new storage sheds, a new school van, and a number of other projects that are outside of the school's regular budget.

If you have any items you are planning on donating or taking to other thrift stores, please bring them to the MCS gymnasium instead. You may drop off your items between June 1st and June 11th. 

We are specifically looking for the following items:

  • Furniture
  • Bikes
  • Sports Equipment
  • Toys
  • Household Items: dishes, working small appliances, lamps
  • Books
  • CDs/ DVDs
  • Yard Equipment and Outdoor Gear
  • Baby Items
  • Unused/ Unopened items

Clothing will not be accepted at this sale. Please hang onto those items for the annual clothing swap. 

In addition to the yard sale, we thought a bake sale would be fun. If you are interested helping with the sale, but do not have items to donate, consider baking some cookies, muffins, or another yummy treat. 

If you would like to volunteer or become a part of this amazing event, please contact the Montessori Community School office at (801) 355 - 1555.

 

 

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Lower Elementary student, Diego Reyes-Lisieski, prepared a 5 star meal for his teachers Monday, May 18th . Not only did Diego share his superior talent and passion for cooking, he was also able to express his appreciation and love for his teachers’ dedication and hard work.

Diego started with a beautiful table setting for four. Shortly thereafter, the MCS kitchen started to really heat up. Attractive aromas began entrancing every person who was within walking distance of Diego and, at the time, his kitchen.

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Diego prepared Beef Wellington, Mashed Potatoes with Leeks, and a Cheesecake. For those of you who are not in the culinary know-how, Beef Wellington is a preparation of filet steak coated with a Pâté (a mixture of cooked ground meat and/or fat minced into a spreadable paste, commonly mixed with other vegetables, herbs, and spices) and then wrapped in puff pastry. This is a very complicated dish and if it is not cooked correctly, this dish can be a disaster.

Fortunately for Diego, the Beef Wellington was executed with excellence. The meat was tender, juicy, and full of rich, overlapping flavors. The Mashed Potatoes with Leeks were not only gorgeous to look at, but possessed the perfect balance of flavors. Often, leeks can be overpowering in a dish that uses a mild, starchy base; however, Diego nailed it.  Diego plated the dish and served each of his Lower Elementary teachers with grace and courtesy.

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Both teachers and Administration were overwhelmed by Diego’s talents, generosity, and care he put into planning, preparation, and implementation of this beautiful way of saying thank you. It is agreed there is no better thank you for teacher than one that comes from the heart (and especially leads to the stomach!) and showcases a students talents, passion, and love of of those talents and passion.

MCS implements a Montessori education in such a way that emphasizes the entire child. This adds an increased focus on practical life skills that empower and connect with a child’s energy and curiosity for learning. Essentially, a Montessori child learns to how to learn and how to love what they are learning.

Diego has been at MCS for the last 5 years. He has relished and thrived in this Montessori environment. A Montessori education has allowed Diego to be able to magnify his talents, abilities, and demonstrate his love of learning. Through Montessori Community School's Lower Elementary teachers, and Maria Montessori’s method of education, Diego is a wonderful youth maturing into an incredibly talented, responsible, and brilliant member of our community.

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Diego is currently a member of the Salt Lake Culinary School and has been featured on KSL’s Good Things Utah for his cooking prowess.  We are excited to follow Diego and his talents through the years to come. 

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“To consider the school as a place where instruction is given is one point of view.

But to consider the school as preparation for life is another. 

In the latter case the school must satisfy all the needs of life.”

      Maria Montessori

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The mission of the Montessori Community School is to provide a rich, educational experience that guides and nurtures the natural unfolding of the whole individual and inspires a lifetime passion for learning and peace.

The Montessori Community School has been established to encourage and promote the intellectual, physical and social development of children. The Montessori philosophy emphasizes the development of the child in a carefully prepared environment.  A prepared environment is one in which the child is able to develop freely at his or her own pace, unhindered in the spontaneous unfolding of his or her natural capacities. This occurs through the manipulation of a graded series of self-correcting materials designed to stimulate the senses, and eventually one’s thinking, leading from perception to intellectual skills.  Responsible freedom and inner self-discipline are encouraged.  The joy of learning is emphasized and the child is helped to develop a positive self-image.  We nurture self-worth.  We affirm that self-worth is the crucial ingredient for the full expression of a person’s potential.  We strive to base every interaction between community members on this principle  -- from how we discipline, to respecting personal learning styles and stages of development.  This is the very fabric of our community and our educational methods.  The social development of the children in the class is greatly emphasized.  It takes place naturally as the children learn to respect each other and become affectionate and cooperative.

The Montessori Community School offers a traditional, comprehensive Montessori curriculum including Practical Life, Sensorial, Language, Math, Geography, History, Science, Spanish, Creative Movement/Dance, Music, Art, Computer Technology,Winter Sports, and Environmental Expeditions.  Learning extends beyond the classroom through field trips, visitors, and community service.

Our Elementary program is split into two levels.  Lower Elementary includes six to nine year old children (grades 1st – 3rd) and Upper Elementary includes nine to twelve year old children (grades 4th – 6th). At the Elementary level emphasis is placed on the students' natural focus on social development and provides a safe environment to explore their developing moral compass. A majority of the time, lessons are given in small groups.  The Elementary curriculum is rich and inviting. Along with moving at their individual academic pace, students practice important life skills including, but not limited to: time management, self regulation and direction, peaceful conflict resolution and contributing to the greater community.  

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The teachers create and adapt the environment with this community of children in mind.  They modify the selection of educational materials available, the physical layout, and the tone of the class, to best fit the needs of the children. Our Montessori teachers serve as observers and guides in the classroom. Many of our teachers have been with us for over a decade and have more than ten years of experience with the Montessori Method.

“Education is a natural process carried out by the child and is not acquired by listening to words but by experiences in the environment.”- Maria Montessori

The Elementary Student

 

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The elementary Montessori program and curriculum is structured around the very specific needs and characteristics of students between the ages of six and twelve years.

  • Reason & Imagination - The inquisitive nature of the elementary student provides the fuel for the research and exploration focus of elementary Montessori. The elementary student wants to know the “why?” and “how?” The six- to twelve-year-old is able to use both reason and imagination to explore and understand increasingly abstract concepts.
  • Exploring Society – While the early childhood student was primarily focused on the construction of the individual, the elementary student begins to explore his place in society. Opportunities continuously present themselves for the student to observe or participate, moments in which to lead or follow.
  • A Need for Togetherness This is the age of clubs and groups. The elementary student explores friendship and cooperation; they learn how to be a leader, a partner, and a follower. While collaboration is encouraged, individual contribution and strength is also valued.
  • Exploring Right and WrongThe six- to twelve-year-old student is actively developing his moral conscience; “That’s not fair!” is heard over and over again in the elementary classroom. Every student may know the rules, but keeping them is another matter. Problem solving techniques are modeled and fostered in the Montessori program. Community brainstorming for solutions and rules helps form the elementary Montessori classroom’s code of conduct.
  • Freedom & Discipline – Independence and inner discipline continue to develop in the elementary years. The six- to twelve-year-old student is capable of increasingly complex and numerous responsibilities, and needs opportunities to exercise judgment and demonstrate self-conduct. Everything from classroom management to the student’s work stems from the student’s freedom to choose and think. Mistakes and failures are viewed as learning opportunities.

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The Elementary Classroom

Students learn best within an environment prepared to nurture and enhance each student’s unique development.

  • Multi-Age Groupings – Elementary Montessori classrooms are comprised of multi-age groupings. This is the practice of teaching students of different ages and abilities together, without organizing either the curriculum or the classroom by age or grade designations. The students remain in the same classroom, with the same instructors, for several years.
  • Classroom Areas – The elementary Montessori classroom is divided into distinct curriculum areas: Science, Geography, History, Art, Math, and Language. Many of these subjects are then organized into separate skill areas. There is a large floor area for spreading out work, and gathering for community meetings and lessons. There are also tables for individual and group activities. The students have notebooks for recording their work and folders to store ongoing projects. Group supplies are located in a central area. A message board displays the day’s schedule as well as reminders and announcements. A wide variety of plants and animals are located throughout the classroom. Arrangements of cut flowers often decorate the tables and music is almost always playing in the background. Replicas of artists’ work adorn the walls. Cleaning materials are accessible to the students since they are custodians of their classroom.  A library is located nearby and available for the students to visit in order to support their research and interests.
  • Materials – The wealth of materials in each area allows the students to follow their own interests. Materials are arranged as to allow sequential progress in skills. Usually there is only one example of each material to encourage turn taking and patience. Materials and their activities vary from individual work, to partner work, to group activities. The materials are aesthetically pleasing with a great many being teacher-made. Many of the materials employ an internal control of error so as to encourage self-monitoring and foster independence in the elementary student.

The Elementary Montessori Teaching Method

Elementary Montessori programs emphasize active learning rather than passive reception of information.

  • The Elementary Montessori curriculum builds upon the students' early childhood experience. The Montessori materials continue to play an important role as the student transitions from the concrete to the abstract.
  • Lessons involve exploration and hands-on experiences. The student in the Elementary classroom learns by doing hence the classroom is rich in materials, resources, movement and conversation.
  • The curriculum is individualized. The needs, ability, interests, and skills of each student are taken into consideration when lessons are planned and knowledge assessed. The Montessori student will receive extra help or direction on areas where she needs it and move rapidly through other areas where she excels.
  • The Elementary Program teaches the student how to think clearly, how to research, and how to express themselves in writing and speech.
  • The program fosters independent work as well as group effort.
  • The multi-age classroom creates an atmosphere of non-competition, making it possible for the student to work at her own pace, unrestricted by traditional grade standards.
  • The program supports a variety of learning styles.
  • Elementary Montessori education integrates all the different areas of study rather than compartmentalizing them.

The Montessori Teacher

“Follow the child” – as Dr. Montessori asserted, the Montessori teacher focuses on the whole child, and not on the daily lesson plan. Dr. Montessori wanted to create a clear distinction between the role of the Montessori teacher and that of a traditional teacher.  She coined the new title “director” or “directress” for the adults in her classrooms and as the name implies, their role is that of a director of activities. Nowadays the term “guide” is more commonly used. The Montessori classroom is a student-centered environment rather than teacher-centered. The teacher is rarely the center of attention. They spends the majority of their time in individual or small group activity or observing the progress of the students.

The Montessori Guide:

  • Tailors lessons and activities to suit the student’s learning style and abilities.
  • Prepares the classroom environment to promote autonomy amongst the students.
  • Maintains an investigation and discovery approach when presenting topics rather than giving facts and figures.
  • Is trained to assess knowledge and achievement through observation of the student.

The Elementary Curriculum Overview

Different from a traditional school setting where teacher-directed curricula determines the daily lessons, the Elementary Montessori students choose their own work. Under the guidance of the teachers, the Montessori students select activities that reflect their ability levels yet present opportunities to practice and perfect skills. Students and teachers work together for large blocks of uninterrupted time within a classroom that is rich in resources.  The students work at their own pace while the Montessori teachers observe and facilitate the learning process. The curriculum’s goal is to encourage students to become active learners rather than passive participants in education. 

The Elementary Montessori Curriculum is designed to meet the needs of students between the ages of six and twelve. Elementary students have an increasing ability to abstract and to imagine; the curriculum engages the students in activities that utilize these affinities. While the curriculum builds upon the students' early childhood classroom practice, it expands to include experiences, opportunities and instruction that are appropriate for the students’ developing minds.  The Montessori materials continue to play an important role as the students transition from the concrete to the abstract. The teachers’ lessons involve exploration, research and hands-on experiences that guide the students in developing their reasoning minds.

 

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Elementary studies include Geography, Biology, History, Language, Mathematics, Science, Music, Movement, and Art. Studies are enriched through field trips, visitors, and workshops that support the curriculum and expand the learning outside of the classroom into the community. 

 

Mathematics

The Elementary Montessori Math Curriculum takes the students through a series of precise exercises using specifically designed materials that support the students’ emergent abilities to abstract. Using hands-on manipulative materials the students in 1st – 3rd grade are given tools by which to do their math work and so acquire a concrete understanding of math skills and knowledge. This solid foundation allows a smooth transition to abstract understanding and application of math skills during the 4th – 6th grades. 

 

 

  Lower Elementary Upper Elementary
Numbers Linear counting, sequencing, place value through millions, before & after numbers, , skip counting, ordinal & Roman numbers, one-step word problems, patterns & relationships Factors & multiples, rounding numbers to nearest 10s & 100s, prime numbers, squaring and cubing, estimating, multiple-step word problems
Operations + - x / of whole numbers, regrouping, missing values, inverse operations, memorization of numerical patterns Large operations in all 4 operations (including long division, multi digit multipliers), operations involving decimals, memorization of tables, percentages, averages
Fractions Identification of fractions, addition & subtraction with common denominators, multiplication & division of fractions by whole numbers, equivalencies Mixed numbers, + and – of fractions with unlike denominators, simplifying fractions
Measurement Standard and metric units of measurement for length, mass & volume Perimeter, area, capacity, word problems
Time Telling time to the minute Elapsed time, 24 hour clock, word problems involving time
Statistics Interpreting data, block and bar graphs Line graphs
Geometry Classification of solids, quadrilaterals, triangles and polygons, study of lines & triangles Study of circles, congruency & symmetry, use of protractor and compass
Money Coin value, totaling amounts Making change, word problems involving money

 

Language

The Elementary reading curriculum is designed to incorporate phonics, whole word, and phonetic exceptions.  Lower Elementary students progress through a leveled reading program using the Pink, Blue, and Green Montessori reading exercises while additional materials and experiences allow them to perfect their reading skills, develop their fluency and comprehension. The Grammar and Vocabulary materials allow the students to assimilate an understanding of the structural rules that govern the English language. Literary elements are explored during Group Literature.  Lower and Upper Elementary students practice writing on a daily basis in classroom journals that cover a variety of writing forms.  In Lower Elementary, Writer’s Workshops are held throughout the year to target specific writing skills. In Upper Elementary the different varieties of writing and writing skills are integrated into their cultural, science and literature studies. Our goal is to help the students become comfortable using writing as a communication skill.  Students learn to think clearly to research, and to express themselves with confidence and clarity in writing and speech.  

 

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  Lower Elementary Upper Elementary
Reading Reading readiness, phonic skills, guided reading, sight words, contextual clues, S.S.R. (Silent Sustained Reading), vocabulary Shared reading, dictionary skills, fluency, expression
Comprehension Responding to questions regarding Story-time book (sequencing events, recapping & summarizing, identification of character, plot & setting) context clues & main ideas Continued study of main ideas, sequencing & context clues, assumptions/inferences, following written directions & instructions
Penmanship Metal inset exercises, D’Nelian print & cursive, spacing, left justification, neatness Mastery of cursive
Spelling Unconventional to conventional, leveled spelling works Conventional spelling lists, spelling demons, vocabulary, spelling rules
Mechanics Ending punctuation, capitalization, commas Apostrophes, commas, quotation marks
Composition Complete sentences, journaling, picture prompted stories, modeled writing, editing Journaling, character & plot development, proofreading, revising, publishing
Study Skills Categorizing, table of contents, index, beginning reports Outlining, note taking, organizing information, skimming, advanced reports, paraphrasing
Grammar Parts of speech, parsing Sentence analysis, verb tenses
Speaking Poetry presentations, in-class reports, drama, story-telling Poetry presentations, in-class reports, drama,   story-telling

Research Skills

In the Elementary classroom, research skills and the preparation of reports are major components of the educational program.  In Lower Elementary, students begin learning the skills needed to research areas of interest or assigned topics, and how to communicate their learning through reports—both formal and informal, written and oral. These skills continue to be examined and employed in Upper Elementary.

 

A special series of lessons, called the “Great Lessons,” are presented each year.  These beautifully told stories give an overview of the formation of the universe, and provide the student with an understanding of the human's place in time and space.  The Great Lessons provide the foundation for study in Geography (How the world came to be and the development of life on Earth), Math (The development of mathematics), Language (The development of language and writing), and History (The story of humans).  The students are given the broad story and proceed to fill in the details during the course of their Elementary years through subsequent "key" lessons.  The intent of the Great Lessons is to create in the students a sense of admiration and wonder.  They will then be compelled to discover more on their own.

 

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Cultural Studies

The Elementary Montessori curriculum uses the term “Cultural Studies” for History, Geography, and the Sciences.

 

  Lower Elementary Upper Elementary
Physical Sciences Process of scientific inquiry, Experiments, Three states of Matter, Studies of the Earth, Solar System Process of scientific inquiry, Experiments, Physics, Chemistry

Life

Sciences

The Five Kingdoms, External parts of Animals, External parts of plants, Body Systems The Five Kingdoms, Classification, Internal functions of animals, Internal functions of plants, Body Systems & Functions
History Days of the week, months, timelines; Study of civilizations, Vertical studies of the fundamental needs of man – clothes, shelter, transportation, defense, communication; US & State History Earth History Timeline, Study of ancient civilizations, US & State history, World History
Geography Identification of continents, oceans and countries; Map reading and making; Biome studies; Land & water formations; Studies of countries Longitude & Latitude coordinates, Scale, Biome Studies, Identification of world land & water formations, Study of countries, states & regions

Science

The Elementary Montessori curriculum includes the Physical and Life sciences. Studies in this discipline follow a three-year rotation.

 

Lower Elementary

 

  Year One Year Two Year Three
Life Sciences Fossils, Life cycles, Flowers & Herbs, Germination, Digestive System Classification, Vertebrates, Trees, Circulatory System Food Chains, Invertebrates, Fruits & Vegetables, Recycling, Skeletal System
Physical Sciences Rocks & Minerals, Sun & Stars, Simple Machines, Magnetism Faults & Earthquakes, Solar System, Light & Sound Continental Drift, Volcanoes, Moon, Electricity & Heat

Upper Elementary

 

  Year One Year Two Year Three
Earth Science Atmosphere Hydrosphere Lithosphere
Body Systems Nervous System Respiratory System Reproductive System
Physical Science Chemistry Physics Astronomy
Biology Plant Kingdom Animal Kingdom Protista, Monera, Fungi

 

Geography & History

Our Elementary students are exposed to a global cultural perspective, learning to understand and appreciate a multicultural world.  The students participate in an annual Cultural Fair each spring, which is a culmination of that year's continent or history focus.  For example, if Africa is our continent focus for a particular year, each student would undertake in-depth research on a particular country and develop a multi-dimensional presentation for the Cultural Fair that is representative of their country (i.e. traditional foods, clothing, instruments, written reports, 3-D representation of topographic features, rivers and mountains, etc.).  When our Upper Elementary students were studying the Vikings and Ancient Rome, they designed costumes, made traditional tools and food, developed video presentations, and wrote in-depth reports to showcase their studies. The Cultural curriculum is examined in three-year cycle. 

 

 

Lower Elementary

 

  Year One Year Two Year Three
History Inca & Maya, Colonial America, Utah’s Statehood Ancient Egypt, Middle Ages, Frontier Studies Explorers, Native Americans
Geography North & South America, Mountains & Caves Europe & Africa, Lakes & Rivers Asia, Australia & Antarctica, Deserts

Utah Studies

State Mineral, State Gem, State Flower, State Fossil, Surrounding States State Tree, State Fish, State Animal, State Bird, Great Salt Lake State Fruit, State Vegetable, State Insect, State Symbol, State Motto

Upper Elementary

 

 
  Year One Year Two Year Three  
World History The Aztecs  The Vikings Ancient Rome  

American History

Colonial America

Transcontinental Railroad

Westward Movement – Mountain Men, Pioneers

Utah Statehood

Native Americans  

Geography

Physical Studies –         North & South America,       Country Study - USA Cultural Studies –                   Europe & Africa,                   Country Study – Ireland Economic Studies – Asia & Australasia, Country Study – New Zealand  
Utah Physical Studies Political Studies Economic Studies  
             

 

Practical Life

The main focus of Practical Life at the elementary level is guiding the student toward responsible independence in action and thought.  Students learn to manage their work and time using a log to plan their day.  Once the students are familiar with using a logbook, they learn to evaluate their own work and then practice goal setting. At the Lower Elementary level students plan a day at a time while at the Upper Elementary level they create a week’s plan.

 

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Elementary students care for classroom animals, provide basic maintenance of their classroom, and learn skills such as flower arranging and knitting. Business ventures include creating products for the monthly market and managing a staff food service business. Practical Life in both Lower and Upper Elementary include school and community services and chores. These include managing our school-wide recycling and composting programs, and creating annual campaigns to help our community have more of an awareness on issues such as waste management.

 

 

Students are encouraged to fully participate in their learning process by doing research and discovering information for themselves. 

 

                                   The Elementary approach to classroom management is to help the students learn that they are responsible for what they do and that their actions have natural consequences.  Students are involved as much as possible in the development of the Elementary Code of Conduct.  Whether a problem involves only two students or the whole class, we teach the students a “Work it Out” method to help them to become problem solvers.  Problem solving techniques are modeled and fostered.  One of the techniques that the teachers use is called “Teacher Theater,” where they model appropriate conflict resolution.  The classroom also has an Agenda Book that provides the students with the opportunity to raise issues that are significant to the Elementary community.

 

 

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                                   Community brainstorming for solutions and rules helps form the Elementary Classroom Code of Conduct.  The students are given increasingly complex and numerous responsibilities, and many opportunities to exercise judgment and demonstrate self-conduct.  Mistakes are viewed as learning opportunities.

 

Each year, the Upper Elementary students are given the opportunity to define the values that they will adopt and practice as a class. Recent examples include the values of responsibility, respect and tolerance.  Upper Elementary students also participate in Socratic Dialogue, which involves open-ended discussion on topics that influence the world around them, as well as the exploration of new ideas. 

 

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Great Outdoors Environmental Program ("GO")

Throughout the year, Upper Elementary students and third year Lower Elementary students participate in an environmental education program called, “The Great Outdoors.” This program combines classroom and field studies in local environmental issues and ecosystems. Environmental expeditions involve observations and studies of local biomes and Salt Lake City's water systems as well as conservation and ecological service projects such as the Bear River Cleanup.

 

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Art
Art Supplies are available in the classroom for students to select as part of their daily work. Students also have an Art Specialty class, where they refine basic art techniques such as pattern, design, texture, shape and line, and learn more advanced techniques such as perspective, medium, shading, dimension, transparency, overlapping, and printmaking. During the Spring Art Showcase, our students have the opportunity to share their artwork with our school community.

Each month, the students study the life and work of a famous artist.  We rotate these artists over the following three-year cycle:

 

Lower Elementary

 

Year One Year Two Year Three
Gustav Klimt Vincent Van Gogh Leonardo da Vinci
Piet Mondrian Georges Seurat William Morris
Norman Rockwell Paul Klee Edvard Munch
Andrew Wyeth Grandma Moses Frida Kahlo
Mary Cassatt Henri Matisse Frank Lloyd Wright
John James Audubon Roy Lichtenstein Katsushika Hokusai
Jackson Pollock Ansel Adams Pablo Picasso
Gilbert Stuart MC Escher Dorothea Lange
Andy Warhol Georgia O’Keeffe Claude Monet

Upper Elementary

 

Year One Year Two Year Three
Giotto di Bondone Limbourg Brothers Michelangelo
Carl Linnaeus Fra Angelico Gustave Courbet
Lorenzo Ghiberti Albrecht Dürer Edgar Degas
El Greco Rembrandt van Rijn Berthe Morisot
Winslow Homer Edouard Manet Paul Gauguin
Auguste Rodin C.M. Russell Salvador Dali
N.C. Wyeth Henry Moore Louise Nevelson
Victor Vasarely Christo Wassily Kandinsky
Diego Rivera Méret Oppenheim Joseph Stella

 

Music

Students have a Music Specialty Class, which provides formal instruction in music.  Using ORFF instruments and recorders, the students learn to keep a steady beat, play rhythm rounds with non-pitched instruments, and read music on the staff.  The students have the opportunity to share what they have learned in Music Specialty Class with our school community during the annual Spring Performance.

 

Each month, the students study the life and work of a famous composer.  We rotate these composers over the following three-year cycle:

 

Year One Year Two Year Three
Miles Davis Beethoven Aaron Copland
John Philip Sousa Elton John Johann Pachelbel
Ferde Grofé Wagner George & Ira Gershwin
Cole Porter Prokofiev Irving Berlin
Duke Ellington Vivaldi Meredith Monk
Rodgers & Hammerstein Gilbert & Sullivan Frederick Chopin
Scott Joplin Enya Marvin Hamlisch
John Williams Mozart Aretha Franklin
Bob Marley The Beatles The Beach Boys

 

Dance

Students have a Dance Specialty Class, which provides formal dance instruction.  In Dance Class, students work on dance elements such as high and low space, slow and fast energy, positive and negative space, tempo changes, different energy levels, high and low planes, and mirroring.  The students refine their locomotion skills, which include sliding, galloping, skipping, jumping, crawling, and rolling.  The students have the opportunity to share what they have learned in Dance Specialty Class with our school community during the annual Spring Performance.

 

Theater

The students study elements of theatre and have the opportunity to participate in our annual Montessori Community Theater performance, which is attended by Kindergarten and Elementary school students and parents.  Poetry recitals occur throughout the year, and at the end of the school year, the students present small skits and songs based on their classroom studies.

 

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Physical Education

Physical education is an important part of the Elementary Montessori Curriculum.  Emphasis is placed on body awareness and physical fitness through playing cooperative games and practicing Yoga. Elementary students also spend a great deal of time hiking and exploring the great outdoors on field trips throughout the year.  Students also have at least 30 minutes of outdoor playtime daily where they may choose to play on the playground, organize their own sports or creative activities, or just relax.

 

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Winter Sports Program

Each year, Elementary students take part in a five-week Winter Sports Program.  The students have the opportunity to take skiing or snowboarding lessons at Brighton Resort.

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Field Trips

Field trips enhance the year’s curriculum.  The students extend their learning beyond the classroom by making several off-campus trips each month to locations such as art exhibits, hiking trails, theatre productions, museums, cultural exhibitions, local farms, and nature preserves.  The students also make frequent visits to Salt Lake City area libraries throughout the year to choose books for classroom reading time or for research projects.

 

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Technology

Computers are introduced to the Elementary students when they are ready to publish their writing and research.  Students learn how to word process, save, and edit their work.  The use of the Internet is carefully supervised.  Students learn how to access online dictionaries and encyclopedias.  Keyboard skills are also introduced, typically during the third year of Lower Elementary.  Upper Elementary students develop skills in Word processing, Power Point presentations, video and photography, and classroom blogging.

 

Home Assignments

Each month, Lower Elementary students are given a Home Assignment, which is typically a project involving library research and hands on learning.  Students are not given "busy work".  Home Assignments are designed to extend and enrich the curriculum, challenging the students to think and explore.  For example, as part of their Egyptian studies, our Lower Elementary students made Egyptian paper, traditional dolls and scarabs.  As part of their medieval studies, the students designed castles out of a material of their choice, labeling all of the parts of the castle. 

 

Testing

We do not use standardized testing as a means of evaluating student progress.  Our method of evaluation includes detailed recordkeeping on each student and direct observation of the application of skills and concepts introduced to each student throughout the year.  Elementary parents receive two written evaluations, and participate in two student-led Parent/Teacher Conferences each academic year.  This method of evaluation enables the student to master a concept or skill before progressing and allows us to identify and address any learning issues that may be preventing that student from moving forward.  It also allows students to move forward rapidly in areas where understanding comes easily and take more time to comprehend areas that may be more difficult for them.

 

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Freedom and Responsibility

Montessori Elementary students are guided in taking on an important role in their own education.  They often have the freedom to choose work partners and topics of study, learning to balance freedom with responsibility.  This nurtures adaptability, negotiation, compromise, problem solving, time management, and respect for others and the environment.  They develop leadership skills by making important decisions on projects related to their elementary community life, as well as giving presentations and voicing their opinions in community meetings throughout the year.

 

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Community Life

Students learn to become active, positive contributors to their school community, and many events throughout the year such as Elementary/Middle School Community Meetings and the Fall and Spring Elementary/Middle School Camping Trips provide ample opportunity for the students to practice these skills and to develop a strong sense of community.

 

Outcomes 

The outcomes of the Montessori Elementary Program are:

  • Students learn how to learn
  • Students become independent
  • Students are active learners
  • Students learn to manage their time
  • Competency and skills in all areas of the curriculum

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Montessori Elementary students find deep personal satisfaction in learning through their own efforts.  They do not compete against each other for grades, or expect external rewards for their work. Students learn to trust themselves and their own judgments.  More importantly, they can acknowledge mistakes and work to correct them in an atmosphere of support and respect. The students take ownership of their work and their environment, and develop self-direction. They develop an innate drive to learn and a natural love for learning that lasts a lifetime. 

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For the 2014 - 2015 school year Montessori Community School is excited to work with our students in a Service-Learning project to once again support our COEEF girls and our Grandmothers through the Adopt-A-Native Elder program. MCS has supported COEEF for more than seven years and the Native American Grandmothers of Adopt-A-Native Elder for over 20 years! We are happy to report that our girls in Ethiopia and our Native American Grandmothers are very grateful for the continued support from the MCS community of families and friends over the years.

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In an effort to raise awareness about family preparedness, this year MCS is offering 72- hour kits as a fundraiser to replace the Fun Run that has been “running” for the past several years.

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Packets containing further information and order forms were sent home in every student's Take-Home File. Please share this information with your families and friends so they too, can be apart of this wonderful cause and further prepare themselves for emergencies and not miss out on this fabulous deal.

 

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Please see the following lists of 72-Hour kits to make your selections.

Elite 72-Hour Kit Includes:

Accordion Jerrycan 10 L

Tritan bottle, 28 fl. Oz.

Water Filter

Mini LED Headlamp

3-LED Dynamo Flashlight

Emergency Blanket - silver color

Vinyl Ground Sheet 110 x 170cm

Emergency Poncho

Flamestick

Waterproof matches

Fire Starter Small

Multi Tool Red

Folding shovel with pick

Folding Map Compass with mirror

SS Whistle

Collapsible Camp Stove (Large) w/40

Flamesticks

Detachable Cutlery Set

S/S Double-wall Cup 300 ml

Laminated Folding Basin 5L

Magic Towel x3

Mini Magic Tissue x3

Watertight map case

Laminated Dry Bag - 10 L

Essentials 72-Hour Kit Includes:

Water Bottle

Straw Filter

Accordion Jerrycan 10L

3-LED Dynamo Flashlight

Emergency Blanket - silver

Emergency Poncho

Paracord Keychain

Flamesticks - Fire Starter

Waterproof Matches

Multi Tool (Red)

Mini Multi Compass

Collapsible Camp Stove (small) w/20

Flamesticks

S/S Tool Spork

S/S Cup 220ml

Magic Towel x3

Mini Magic Tissue x3

First Aid Kit (smaller than Elite Kit)

Watertight map case

Stuff Bag - S 18 x 30 cm

Dry Bag - 10 L Dry Bag

Kids 72-Hour Kit Includes:

Water Bottle

Straw filter

Emergency Blanket - silver

Emergency Poncho

Keychain Compass + Thermometer

SS Whistle

3-LED Dynamo Flashlight

Magic Towel x3

Stuff Bag - S 18 x 30 cm

Expansion 72-Hour Kit Includes:

Tritan bottle, 12 fl. Oz.

Straw Filter

3-LED Dynamo Flashlight

Emergency Blanket - silver color

Emergency Poncho

Flamestick

Waterproof matches

Keychain Compass + Thermometer

SS Whistle

S/S Tool Spork

S/S Double-wall Cup 300 ml

Magic Towel x3

Mini Magic Tissue x3

Watertight map case

Laminated Dry Bag - 5 L

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Based on our ecosystem outings this year, the GO (Great Outdoors) students have spent a lot of time researching different ecosystems of their choice. These nature cards are the result of their hard work, time, knowledge, and talents.

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Each card features a drawing of a particular ecosystem, and inside the cards are some interesting facts derived from their studies.

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This is a great opportunity to support the students' studies, interests, and art. It is also a great way to share these talents throughout the year with your friends, family, and co-workers. You may purchase these beautiful cards for $3.00 each or you may purchase 5 cards for $12.00. Cards will go on sale in the MCS lobby this Friday, May 1st.  

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Montessori Community School loves the passion our students have toward caring for our earth. They help with keeping our grounds clear of trash, working in our gardens, composting, and planting raised garden beds. Our students also implement and are responsible for recycling throughout our school. We try very hard to make our school and community a greener place.

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This year, our Spring Campers did an in-depth study of the moon. Camp started out with the history of the moon. Students learned about how the moon formed and how the moon and the ocean relate. Next, students learned about the phases of the moon, making a phases of the moon viewer and doing a light and shadow experiment.

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Each day the students have done amazing, creative art projects, crafts, and experiments revolving around the moon. When students learned about spacecraft, they made and launched rockets outside. They also watched the first landing on the moon.

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Next came a day of learning about astronauts. They learned about what a space suit and space food is like and why. Students created their own space packs and enjoyed pretending they were on the moon and cruising around in space.

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The last day of camp featured the surface of the moon. Students learned about moon rocks, mountains, and craters. They also learned about what the absence of gravity means. Students were able to create their own moon sand and make textured paintings of the moon. We would love to thank all the teachers and staff who worked during camp and made it such a success. We would also love to thank the students who came, explored, and created such a wonderful atmosphere and brought such an enthusiasm to this past week. 

"Our aim is not only to make the child understand, and still less to force him to memorize, but so to touch his imagination as to enthuse him to his innermost core." - Maria Montessori

Lastly, a special thank you goes to our Spring Camp Director, Ms. Corey Day. Thank you for planning and implementing such a creative, fun, educational, and organized Spring Camp. Your skills and talents are unmatched. We are blessed to have you.

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MCS Lower Elementary students, 1st - 3rd Grade, created art pieces for the University of Utah's Eccles Institute of Human Genetics Building. The showing is on the 3rd floor atrium of the building. This building houses the Department of Human Genetics, Molecular Medicine, USTAR,  [2007 Nobel prize winner Dr. Mario Capecchi], and many other researchers.  
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Amy Fought, our Lower Elementary Art Teacher explains, "At Montessori Community School we have enjoyed exploring paint and color with our creative art installations of 'Shapes and Silhouettes.'  Working in groups of two or three, students got together to practice the style of Wassily Kandinsky, famous for his abstract art. "
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"We spent time emulating a few of Kandinsky’s famous pieces that focused on repetitions of circles. Although art often focuses on the foreground, or “positive space,” we chose to bring to life our background, or “negative space,” by choosing bright and colorful shapes to paint, as Kandinsky did."
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"The students were given only the primary colors (magenta, yellow, and blue) to begin with, and they created their own beautiful variations of colors to create layers upon layers of their shapes.  They then overlaid their work with a tree silhouette of their choosing, drawing and cutting a simple picture that would not detract from the beauty of their background.  The result was a beautiful set of pieces that shows the ingenuity and creativity of young minds."
 
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To close our Winter Sports season, Brighton Resort would love to host an MCS Family Ski Day. Tickets are at a reduced rate and can be purchased from the MCS Office. When purchasing your tickets, please ensure to make checks out to MCS. 

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Spring cleaning? It's that time again to bring in all of your children's gently used clothing that is too small, or unworn and swap it for something that fits. Please drop off your gently used items in the bins located in the MCS gymnasium. You may drop off items March 16th - March 20th. 

Then, during school hours, March 26th and March 27th, you may come browse the tables in the gym. Clothes will be separated into size and style. If you are looking for volunteer opportunities, please contact the office, as the Green Committee would love help sorting, folding, and displaying the clothes. 

 

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There will not be any Winter Sports this Wednesday, February 25th. Instead, enjoy this video of the last 3 weeks of our Winter Sports Program.

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Montessori Community School sponsors the above beautiful girls. These girls have been growing up right before our eyes! We are so proud of their accomplishments and continue to support and encourage their goals and dreams through the COEEF Program.

Our girls have written lovely letters we would love to share with you. COEEF-GIRLS-2014.pdf. Please watch for our fundraisers this spring to continue supporting these amazing girls. 

 

 

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Please find Spring Camp registration forms on the credenza by the stairs in the lobby. Spring Camp will run Monday, March 30th - Friday, April 3rd. 

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During Spring Camp, the students will learn all about the moon! Please look over the daily schedule above.

 

Download the forms here:

Spring-Registration.pdf

Spring-Camp-2015.pdf

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The first day of Winter Sports was a success! We would love to thank all those who chaperoned and made it possible for our students to enjoy and learn such great activities and develop their skills and talents. 

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MCS' Ski and Snowboard lessons are taught at Brighton Resort. The first day of lessons can be a bit tricky as instructors adjust groups. Instructors will assess each student and figure out what level that student will enjoy and be able to continue to develop and enhance their skills.

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Our chaperones were great in helping to keep spirits high, students organized, and feeling secure. This year we have 24 Kindergartners participating in the Winter Sports Program. It was awesome to see them hauling their gear by themselves to and from the school and also to observe the older students reassuring and comforting them. 

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Murray County Ice is providing ice-skating lessons to a portion of our students. Again, our parent chaperones were wonderful in providing support to our students and teachers.  

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Spirits were high as students finished their lesson and moved into the free-skate period to practice what they learned. 

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Winter Sports will be starting in two weeks. You should have received the following pdfs in your email. Please read through and ensure you and your child are prepared for Wednesday, February 4th! If you have questions or concerns, please contact Ashlee Haslam at (801) 355 - 1555. 

Parent-Letter-Skiing-and-Snowboarding.pdf

Chaperone-Letter.pdf

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Parent-Letter-Ice-skating.pdf

Chaperone-Letter-ICE-Skating.pdf

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This year's Winter Camp has been themed around a Winter Wonderland. Students have had many creative arts and craft activities. One of the favorites was the Snowy Owl Pinecones pictured above.
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Students also got the chance to play outside with their friends. Blowing bubbles in the snow made for a great learning activity. The students loved chasing, popping, and watching the bubbles float to land on the snow- Would the bubbles freeze, or not?
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Also, learning about some of Winter's greatest wonders and works of art, the Northern Lights, students created their own beautiful art using the aurora borealis as inspiration.
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This year, Montessori Community School particpated in a service learning opportunity that touched the lives of many by supporting a local charity. 

 

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This year, after looking into many areas of need in our community, we participated 

in the Fill-the-Pack Project created by the Homeless Youth Resource Center. This relatively new program provides a way to get some basic survival necessities (toothbrushes, toiletries, hats, gloves, and blankets are just a few of the items in the packs) to teens that are living on the streets of Salt Lake City.

 
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MCS provided two backpacks for each of our classrooms to fill with items from the Homeless Youth Resource Center needs list.There was such a wonderful response from our students and families! We were able to fill and deliver 24 backpacks plus many other various items that were brought in and donated. Imagining these teens out on the streets trying to make it- these backpacks were truly a heartfelt, supportive gift. We know our community felt the spirit of giving when one family filled two backbacks on their own and many students were talking about how grateful they are to have families supporting them and warm beds to sleep in at night. Our students kept trying to fit more and more into these packs. Their kind hearts and generosity was overwhelming.

 

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Thank you to all the MCS families who helped with this tremendous project and learning opportunity. To find our more about the Homeless Youth Resource Center, please check out the following links:

 

Homeless Youth in Salt Lake City

Volunteers of America

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                                                  Intermountain LiVe Well Assembly

                                                 The 8 Health Habits—The Musical!

MCS Kindergarteners, Elementary, and Middle School students attended Intermountain’s LiVe Well assembly.

The assembly was a fun-filled 45-minute health education show called LiVe—The 8 Healthy Habits Musical!

 

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The Grand Theatre and Corporate Staging Resources brought the excitement of live theater to MCS in hopes

to encourage students to adopt healthy eating and exercise habits. In a mix of drama and humor, performers

spoke to our students hoping to empower them with the skills they need to critically evaluate media messages

and peer group pressures in order to make healthy choices from eating more vegetables and obtaining at least

10 hours of sleep at night.

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The first 3 healthy habits revolve around the food and drinks that are put into our bodies:

     1.   Always east breakfast and make it a healthy one.

      2.   Eat more fruits and vegetables.

      3.   Limit –or eliminate sweetened beverages.

Followed by the next two healthy habits revolving around activity:

       4.   Sit less and limit screen time. 

       5.   Move more.

The final 3 involve sleep and support.

       6.   Get enough sleep.

       7.   Eat meals together as a family.

       8.   Be positive about food and body image.

Wholesome varieties of activity, food, sleep, and support are proven to be crucial to a balanced and healthy

lifestyle.  The LiVe Well program is geared toward educating and motivating the younger generations to practice

and incorporate the 8 health habits into their lives.

 

Our MCS students were, of course, the perfect audience. Our students demonstrated the utmost level of respect

with beautiful live interaction and well thought out responses.

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MCS encourages our parents to review with their students the 8 healthy habits and find ways to better

incorporate these practices into their daily routine. Parents may have one of the most powerful roles in helping

to shape a child’s life. Support from parents and/ or guardians is essential to forming habits. Let us try to make

healthier choices for our future generations and ourselves. 

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Montessori Community School is celebrating Dia de los Muertos this week by creating beautiful candy skulls, key chains, and other festive artwork. We have three altars set up in our lobby to celebrate the lives of people we love and admire.
 
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Dia de los Muertos assures that the dead not be insulted by mourning or sadness. Instead, Dia de los Muertos celebrates the lives of the deceased with food, drink, parties, and actifities the dead enjoyed in life. The holiday recognizes death as a natural part of the human experience, a continuum with birth, childhood, and growing up to become a contributing member of the community.  On Dia de los Muertos, the dead are also a part of the community, awakened from their eternal sleep to share in the celebrations with their families and loved ones. 
 
We give a special thank you to all those involved in our Spanish program and for the wonderful job they do in teaching, sharing, and enriching our lives with such a beautiful language and culture. 
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