Earthquake Drill Success!


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Students practice "Duck and Cover" upon hearing the Earthquake Alarm sound.  


At 10:15am today our school participated in an earthquake drill.  The students practiced "drop and cover."  Once given the all clear the students and teachers evacuated the building.  The drill was successful and following the drill our staff reviewed additional procedures that would benefit MCS in the event of an earthquake.  Development of our Emergency Preparedness plan is ongoing.  Some information can be found in our Parent Handbooks and we anticipate that by fall we will have a more detailed write-up to share with families.Thank you for your ongoing support!Students practice "Duck and Cover" upon hearing the Earthquake Alarm sound.  Teachers call roll upon arrival to the back field.Everyone is accounted for!Audio played over our P.A. system to symbolize the earthquake.
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MCS Prepares to Participate in Utah's Great Shake Out

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Thursday, April 17, 2014, Montessori Community School will participate in the Great Utah Shake Out.  Our staff Emergency Preparedness team has met to review procedures and future preparation plans.  Thursday at 10:15 am our students and staff will participate in an earth quake drill where we will practice "Drop, Cover and Hold On."  Then we will practice an evacuation of the building.  Parents will be informed once all students have been accounted for. Many thanks to Ramira, Jan, Bob and the rest of our staff for your commitment to the safety of our staff and students.  
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1898 Hits

The Magic of Observation

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What has allowed Montessori to stand the test of time?  What has protected the method that first began in 1907?  Many methods of education have been tried and tested for years in the United States but Montessori is one program that has not only stayed around, but is growing and receiving more recognition than ever.  Montessori schools, including those in the public sector, are on the rise in the United States of America.  Most Montessorians will agree that beneath many layers the most basic element continues to exist.  This simple concept that gives heed to the needs of the child is that of observation. "The Montessori Method continues to serve children well because it is based on the scientific observation of individual children....The lessons, the materials, that careful order of presentation, work because, and only because, they respond to the observed needs of the individual child. Montessori requires consistent and objective research...
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2436 Hits

Developing Concentration



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"As soon as children find something that interests them they lose their instability and learn to concentrate."-Maria Montessori
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2043 Hits

8 Ways to Help Your Child Deal With Mean Kids

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Elementary age children are in a socially sensitive period and are developing their moral judgement. Their world is opening and building relationships with peers holds more value than ever before.  In this article entitled "8 Ways to Help Your Child Deal With Mean Kids" Patty Shade talks about what parents can do to validate their children without making them feel like victims of cruelty.  Managing those emotions and sifting through others children's behavior can be a difficult task for our children as they begin to explore new and different relationships and try to maintain and manage ongoing relationships. 8 Ways to Help Your Child Deal With Mean Kids by Patty Shade“Ben is being mean to me!!”“I don’t like Allie. She’s SO mean!”Surprisingly, complaints like this are common in my Lower Elementary Montessori classroom. And, I’m guessing that, at one time or another, you have heard something similar from your own child. [Read...
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2214 Hits

Building Confidence by: Edward Fidellow

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One of the great attributes of success is confidence. While success breeds confidence, confidence also breeds success. However, there are no real courses on success, no seven easy steps, no magic potions, so how do we help our children build this important component into their lives? The first level of building confidence is the ability to finish a project. In Montessori you introduce activities that are reasonable for the child to achieve. Second, you then give the child the time to achieve. Third, the project has to have value; it has to be worthwhile. (Learning to tie your shoes for a young child meets this need.) For confidence to build the project also has to have an element of real challenge – not one that can be accomplished in a moment or a day – learning to read fills this bill. Real confidence has to take you through all kinds of situations...
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Becoming a Montessori Parent by Edward Fidellow

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Becoming a Montessori Parentby Edward FidellowThis Montessori parent, and school administrator, joins her three Montessori children on a field trip this fall.There are seven simple steps to becoming a Montessori parent. When we say simple we don’t mean that they are not challenging. It is a lot like the definition of bull riding. “The object is to keep the bull between you and the ground.” Simple – but challenging.The first step to becoming a Montessori parent took place when you enrolled your child in a Montessori program. That in itself is a challenge. Most of us weren’t raised in a Montessori school. The whole concept is foreign and takes a bit of courage to step out of the norm and our comfort zone. We may have chosen the program because it wasn’t like our school experience (which is why we chose it.) Or we chose it because we saw something unique...
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3012 Hits

Students Learn How Their School is Powered by Renewable Energy

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The Montessori Community School has recently completed installation of one of Salt Lake City's largest private solar energy systems. The 52.2 kilowatt photovoltaic (PV) array will create enough energy to provide most of the school's electrical needs throughout the year. The system is expected to operate for a maintenance-free life of more than 25 years.The project has a multiple objectives: To reduce dependence on outside electricity supply for the school, provide renewable energy education for students, lower demands on regional fossil fuel generators thus improving air quality, and raise community awareness about renewable energy options. A monitor screen in the school will track the system's performance in real time as a learning tool for students and the community.Current Energy Production at Montessori Community School Solar PanelsUsing conventional financing, the project is being funded by lowering electrical energy costs at the school, a grant from Rocky Mountain Power, and State and Federal...
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