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The History of Montessori


Enjoy this beautiful timeline of Maria Montessori. The History of Montessori Education by Giraffe Childcare
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A Closer Look at Montessori Math


The Montessori math curriculum is quite unlike the traditional approach that each of us experienced.  It is based on developing a strong foundation through concrete experience and manipulation until the time a child reaches the age of abstraction, typically around nine years old. As they engage in the Cosmic Curriculum, children are given a basis for the interconnectedness of all things and encouraged to engage in the wonder and magic of mathematical concepts.  Various activities and materials develop the mathematical mind, preparing the child for their inevitable explosion in to abstraction and connection to the power of relationships.  The following was written by Lower Elementary Spanish teacher, Diana Haro Reynolds. Mathematics is the study of quantity, form, and magnitude. We live among it. It is in the position of the sun and in the shell of a snail. We carry math in our pockets, in our devices. It is what makes...
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Parent Education Night


Sign-up outside of your student's classroom. Childcare will be provided, however, you must sign up in advance. This is a really great night full of insight regarding the education of your child in relation to Montessori Philosophy. Don't miss out! (Your attendance can go toward Parent Volunteer Hours).
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Your Daily Dose of Resilience-Building by Melissa DeVries, Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist

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Raising children in the twenty-first century is a most rewarding challenge. In modern society we have increased access to mass media and greater sprawl within families. Youth are increasingly influenced by sources of information beyond parental control. Thus, our task as parents is to figure out how to balance sheltering our children while still preparing them for the future. Research has identified many key elements that predict better quality of life in adulthood; academic achievement, absence of medical and mental health problems, financial stability, and rewarding social connections with others. Yet most of us at one point or another face situations that create vulnerabilities in these areas. So this begs the question, how do we bounce back? And more importantly, how do we teach our children to demonstrate the same perseverance when faced with stressors? Everyday I work with families who are striving to bolster the skills and abilities of...
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Elementary Curriculum - Language

The elementary reading curriculum is designed to incorporate phonics, whole word and phonetic exceptions. Lower elementary students progress through a leveled reading program using the Pink, Blue and Green Montessori reading exercises while additional materials and experiences allow them to perfect their reading skills, develop their fluency and comprehension. The Grammar and Vocabulary materials allow the students to assimilate an understanding of the structural rules that govern the English language. Literary elements are explored during Group Literature. Lower and upper elementary students practice writing on a daily basis in classroom journals that cover a variety of writing forms. In lower elementary, Writer’s Workshops are held throughout the year to target specific writing skills. In upper elementary the different varieties of writing and writing skills are integrated into their cultural, science and literature studies. Our goal is to help the students become comfortable using writing as a communication skill. Students learn...
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Elementary Curriculum - Mathematics

The elementary Montessori math curriculum takes the students through a series of precise exercises using specifically designed materials that support the students’ emergent abilities to abstract. Using hands-on manipulative materials the students in 1st – 3rd grade are given tools by which to do their math work and so acquire a concrete understanding of math skills and knowledge. This solid foundation allows a smooth transition to abstract understanding and application of math skills during the 4th – 6th grades.   Lower Elementary Upper Elementary Numbers Linear counting, sequencing, place value through millions, before & after numbers, <, =, or >, skip counting, ordinal & Roman numbers, one-step word problems, patterns & relationships Factors & multiples, rounding numbers to nearest 10s & 100s, prime numbers, squaring and cubing, estimating, multiple-step word problems Operations + - x / of whole numbers, regrouping, missing values, inverse operations, memorization of numerical patterns Large operations in...
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The Elementary Curriculum Overview

Different from a traditional school setting where teacher-directed curricula determines the daily lessons, the Elementary Montessori students choose their own work. Under the guidance of the teachers, the Montessori students select activities that reflect their ability levels yet present opportunities to practice and perfect skills. Students and teachers work together for large blocks of uninterrupted time within a classroom that is rich in resources. The students work at their own pace while the Montessori teachers observe and facilitate the learning process. The curriculum’s goal is to encourage students to become active learners rather than passive participants in education. The elementary Montessori curriculum is designed to meet the needs of students between the ages of six and twelve. Elementary students have an increasing ability to abstract and to imagine; the curriculum engages the students in activities that utilize these affinities. While the curriculum builds upon the student's early childhood classroom practice, it...
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The Montessori Teacher

“Follow the child” – as Dr. Montessori asserted, the Montessori teacher focuses on the whole child and not on the daily lesson plan. Dr. Montessori wanted to create a clear distinction between the role of the Montessori teacher and that of a traditional teacher. She coined the new title “director” or “directress” for the adults in her classrooms and as the name implies their role is that of a director of activities. Nowadays the term “guide” is more commonly used. The Montessori classroom is a student-centered environment rather than teacher-centered. The teacher is rarely the center of attention. She spends the majority of her time in individual or small group activity or observing the progress of the students. The Montessori guide: tailors lessons and activities to suit the student’s learning style and abilities. prepares the classroom environment to promote autonomy amongst the students. maintains an investigation and discovery approach when...
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The Elementary Montessori Teaching Method

Elementary Montessori programs emphasize active learning rather than passive reception of information. The elementary Montessori curriculum builds upon the student’s early childhood experience. The Montessori materials continue to play an important role as the student transitions from the concrete to the abstract. Lessons involve exploration and hands-on experiences. The student in the elementary classroom learns by doing hence the classroom is rich in materials, resources, movement and conversation. The curriculum is individualized. The needs, ability, interests and skills of each student are taken into consideration when lessons are planned and knowledge assessed. The Montessori student will receive extra help or direction on areas where she needs it and move rapidly through other areas where she excels. The elementary program teaches the student how to think clearly, how to research, how to express herself in writing and speech. The program fosters independent work as well as group effort. The multi-age classroom...
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The Elementary Classroom

Students learn best within an environment prepared to nurture and enhance each student’s unique development. Multi-Age Groupings – Elementary Montessori classrooms are comprised of multi-age groupings. This is the practice of teaching students of different ages and abilities together without organizing either the curriculum or the classroom by age or grade designations. The students remain in the same classroom, with the same instructors, for several years. Classroom Areas – The elementary Montessori classroom is divided into distinct curriculum areas: Science, Geography, History, Art, Math and Language. Many of these subjects are then organized into separate skill areas. There is a large floor area for spreading out work and gathering in for community meetings and lessons. There are tables for individual and group activities. The students have notebooks for recording their work and folders to store ongoing projects. Group supplies are located in a central area. A message board displays the...
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The Elementary Student

The elementary Montessori program and curriculum is structured around the very specific needs and characteristics of students between the ages of six and twelve years. Reason & Imagination - The inquisitive nature of the elementary student provides the fuel for the research and exploration focus of elementary Montessori. The elementary student wants to know the “why?” and “how?” The six- to twelve-year-old is able to use both reason and imagination to explore and understand increasingly abstract concepts. Exploring Society – While the early childhood student was primarily focused on the construction of the individual, the elementary student begins to explore his place in society. Opportunities continuously present themselves for the student to observe or participate, moments in which to lead or follow. A Need for Togetherness – This is the age of clubs and groups. The elementary student explores friendship and cooperation; he learns how to be a leader, a...
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Why Spanish?

The United States has approximately 50 million Spanish speakers.  The Western United States including Utah have the highest percentage of Spanish speakers.  Demographic and economic trends, including greater purchasing power among Latinos and Spanish speakers and interconnectedness in the Americas from Canada to Chile, suggest Spanish will grow even more important throughout the century. Additional reasons for learning languages including better access to other cultures and communication possibilities.

Why should my child be enrolled in dual language?

The dual language program offers your child the chance to develop communication ability in Spanish and English. This could be difficult at first, but being bilingual may enhance your child’s potential opportunities (jobs, culture, etc). Acquisition of language by children has been studied widely. Children have advantages over adults in language learning. Natural curiosity and a willingness to make mistakes help the child. Adults often hesitate when speaking another language for fear of erroneous pronunciation or grammar. Children, especially young children, tend not to have that fear. Children easily pick up and model accents. Few adults who learn other languages pick up the correct accents. Many children do to the point at which they pronounce as well as a native speaker. Of course, those children generally start to learn the language before their teens with the help of native speakers.

Does it affect or help my child if I have a language background?

Every child that is enrolled in the Dual Program goes through the same process of learning. Children who hear other languages spoken at home tend to learn languages faster.  Some ideas for home are: Interact with your child. Learn about dual language education. Encourage your child to speak the second language. Give your child the benefit of the doubt. Do not ask your child to translate. This requires advanced skills that could frustrate your child. Try to avoid comparing your child’s progress to that of other children. Rates of progress differ. Be willing to participate in opportunities to expose your child to Spanish and culture(s)outside school. Praise your child for his or her progress.

How does the Dual Language Program work at Montessori Community School?

In the dual language class, children are encouraged to evenly divide their time between Montessori works in English and Spanish. One teacher speaks and presents lessons to the children in English while the other speaks and presents lessons in Spanish. Teachers generally speak their native language though the Spanish teachers are bilingual in case a child needs assistance in English. With time, every child in the class will learn Spanish. Children in the classroom have the opportunity to learn how to communicate in both languages. They will experience speaking, listening, reading and writing. Reading and speaking in both languages is necessary to become bilingual, bi-literate and bicultural.

Montessori: Your Daily Dose of Resilience-Building

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Raising children in the twenty-first century is a most rewarding challenge. In modern society we have increased access to mass media and greater sprawl within families. Youth are increasingly influenced by sources of information beyond parental control. Thus, our task as parents is to figure out how to balance sheltering our children while still preparing them for the future. Research has identified many key elements that predict better quality of life in adulthood; academic achievement, absence of medical and mental health problems, financial stability, and rewarding social connections with others. Yet most of us at one point or another face situations that create vulnerabilities in these areas. So this begs the question, how do we bounce back? And more importantly, how do we teach our children to demonstrate the same perseverance when faced with stressors? Everyday I work with families who are striving to bolster the skills and abilities of...
More Info